Global Child Trafficking: The Hidden Human Tragedy of Our Time

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International Center for Ethno-Religious Mediation

In partnership with

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Presents
Global Child Trafficking: The Hidden Human Tragedy of Our Time

An ICERM Radio Special Broadcast, “Let’s Talk About It”

Distinguished Guest:

Dr. Carol Bellamy, Former Executive Director of UNICEF, the children’s agency of the United Nations.

Dr. Carol Bellamy, Former Executive Director of UNICEF, the children’s agency of the United Nations.

Dr. Carol Bellamy, Former Executive Director of UNICEF

Host: Tziporah Pronman

Date: Wednesday, September 3, 2014 at 7 pm in Eastern Time, New York

Join the conversation and listen to the show “live” at:  http://www.blogtalkradio.com/icermradio/2014/09/03/global-child-trafficking-the-hidden-human-tragedy-of-our-time 

To share your views or ask questions, dial +1-(347) 989-8294.

About Dr. Carol Bellamy:

Dr. Carol Bellamy recently completed her term as the Chair of the Global Partnership for Education Board of Directors. During that period Dr. Bellamy oversaw a significant transformation of the Global Partnership, including the establishment of a representative Board of Directors, a highly successsful rebranding and replenishment campaign, the development of a long-term strategic plan for the Partnership and the appointment of the Partnership’s first ever Chief Executive Officer.

Prior to this, Dr. Bellamy served as President and CEO of World Learning, a private, non-profit organization promoting international understanding through education and development in over 70 countries. Dr. Bellamy previously served 10 years as Executive Director of UNICEF, the children’s agency of the United Nations. She was also the first former volunteer to become Director of Peace Corps.

Dr. Bellamy has worked in the private sector at Bear, Stearns & Co., Morgan Stanley, and Cravath, Swaine & Moore. She spent 13 years as an elected public official, including five years in the New York State Senate. In 1978, she became the first woman to be elected to citywide office in New York City when she was elected President of the NYC Council, a position she held until 1985. Dr.Bellamy was named one of Forbes magazine’s 100 Most Powerful Women in the World in 2004. In 2009, Dr. Bellamy was awarded the Légion d’Honneur by the Government of France. She also chairs the Board of Governors of the International Baccalaureate. Dr. Bellamy was recently appointed as Chair of the International Board of Trustees of ECPAT (End Child Prostitution and Trafficking).

Discussing the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict with Empathy and Compassion

A new civic movement made up of peace-driven individuals who recognize the same humanity in all peoples, and are passionate about bridging the gap between different races, ethnicities, religions, political views, genders, generations and nationalities, in order to increase respect, tolerance, acceptance, understanding and harmony in the world.

A new civic movement made up of peace-driven individuals who recognize the same humanity in all peoples, and are passionate about bridging the gap between different races, ethnicities, religions, political views, genders, generations and nationalities, in order to increase respect, tolerance, acceptance, understanding and harmony in the world.

You are cordially invited to the upcoming Living Together Movement forum discussion in New York City.

Theme:“Discussing the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict with Empathy and Compassion”

When: Thursday, August 28, 2014

Time: 6:00 pm in Eastern Time. 

Where: John H. Holmes Community House, First Floor.

28 East 35th Street, New York, NY 10016.

Registration: Registration is free and open to the public. You must register at:  http://www.livingtogethermovement.eventzilla.net to attend the forum discussion.

“The Living Together Movement is like “a home outside a home. We gather, we talk, we listen, we learn, we share and we celebrate in a relaxed, friendly, and welcoming ambience.”

Forum Reflection:

Nations are different than countries and can exist within, across and outside of political borders. Unlike countries which are usually founded upon common history and geography, nations are born of shared ideology and the traditions that support its precepts.

These beliefs and practices create and sustain a robust communal identity providing a sense of belonging and mutual obligation to its population. These dynamics can play a healthy role in the lives of individuals and community members, but can also be discriminatory and exclusionary, leading to separation and segregation from other peoples. In these instances, people can become intolerant and prejudicial in their thinking about, and actions towards, others resulting in bigotry at the least and apartheid at the extreme.

Sadly, in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, entire generations of people have been raised in the state of active hostility between the two groups, which have different ideologies, an interwoven history and a shared geography. This is a real challenge.

For a meaningful discussion, forum participants are encouraged to reflect on the following questions:

  • What are the identities that have developed from these ideologies that may play a role in the crisis?
  • How are these identities reinforced and maintained? 
  • What are the biases and prejudices that have emerged?
  • What aspects of these two ideologies, traditions, beliefs and ethics support peace?
  • The care and protection of others? 
  • Fair and impartial treatment of others?
  • The protection of human dignity, right and just action, and respect toward others?
  • Where do the principles and credos of these two peoples regarding the responsibility toward others intersect? Overlap?
  • How might these places of correspondence and agreement help to bring about changes in perceptions and behavior that would be life-affirming, and cooperation building?

Bring your unique stories, cultural backgrounds, life experiences, words of wisdom, feelings, worries, disappointments, success stories, etc. Everyone will be given an equal opportunity to talk about / share with the group anything of particular interest to him or her.

We practice empathic listening, and do not judge or criticize anyone. Our goal is to truly understand the other before seeking to be understood; and to focus on what the other person is saying rather than what we are going to say next.

To celebrate our diversity in a symbolic manner, please bring your favorite/cultural/ethnic songs (if you have one), light food and drinks to the meeting; and together we shall renew our commitment to live together in mutual respect and dignity.

About Living Together Movement:

The Living Together Movement, a project of the International Center for Ethno Religious Mediation, is a new civic movement made up of peace-driven individuals who recognize the same humanity in all peoples, and are passionate about bridging the gap between different races, ethnicities, religions, political views, genders, generations and nationalities, in order to increase respect, tolerance, acceptance, understanding and harmony in the world.

We come together every month to listen to, talk with, learn from, understand and share with one another. Each member enriches the group with a unique story and cultural background. Everyone is given an equal opportunity to talk about his or her cultural background and feelings, or any topics of interest, including but not limited to security issues, politics, policies, war, conflict, conflict resolution, human dignity, forgiveness, foreign relations, world peace, economy, education, employment, family, health, immigration, science and technology.

We practice empathic listening, and do not judge or criticize anyone. Our goal is to truly understand the other before seeking to be understood; and to focus on what the other person is saying rather than what we are going to say next.

We celebrate our diversity in a symbolic manner with the traditional arts, songs, food and drinks that our members bring to the living together forum.

2014 Annual International Conference On Ethnic And Religious Conflict Resolution And Peacebuilding

The International Center for Ethno-Religious Mediation is pleased to announce its

1st   Annual International Conference On

Ethnic And Religious Conflict Resolution And Peacebuilding

Theme:  The Advantages of Ethnic & Religious Identity in Conflict Mediation and Peacebuilding

Venue: 136 East 39th Street

Between Lexington Avenue and 3rd Avenue

New York, NY 10016, USA 

Date: Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Time: 9am – 5pm

Keynote Speaker: Ambassador Suzan Johnson Cook

3rd Ambassador at Large for International Religious Freedom for the United States of America

Click Here To Register

«Peace has a chance when despite history, despite politics, despite ethnicity or faith, and despite hardship, people learn to tap into their own cultural ethos of cooperation – Dr. Dianna Wuagneux»

«Peace has a chance when despite history, despite politics, despite ethnicity or faith, and despite hardship, people learn to tap into their own cultural ethos of cooperation – Dr. Dianna Wuagneux»

Sponsorship Package

Gold Level Sponsor     $5,000

Silver Level Sponsor $2,500 Bronze Level Sponsor $1,000

Bridge Builder           $500

 

Company name, logo, and hyperlink recognizing on conference website. Company name, logo, and hyperlink recognizing on conference website. Company name, logo, and hyperlink recognizing on conference website. Name and/or organization featured on the ICERM website and brochure as a conference sponsor.
Recognition as a gold conference sponsor in program guide and promotional materials. Recognition as a silver conference sponsor in program guide and promotional materials. Recognition as a bronze conference sponsor in program guide and promotional materials. Free ICERM membership with membership benefits for a period of one year.
Sign recognition at the event. Sign recognition at the event. Sign recognition at the event. Bridge builder receives 1 complimentary ticket.
Attendee mailing list prior to the conference; and 5 complimentary tickets. Attendee mailing list prior to the conference; and 3 complimentary tickets. Attendee mailing list prior to the conference; and 1 complimentary ticket.  
Exhibit table booth opportunity (booth fee included.) Exhibit table opportunity (table fee included.)  
Full page ad program guide. ½ page ad program guide.
Verbal recognition at the event. Verbal recognition at the event.
Sponsorship of opening keynote speaker.  
Eligibility to sponsor a major speaker at the event or speak as a featured speaker (opening remarks).
Banner ad on event website, guide, brochure and all promotional materials.

To sponsor our Annual International Conference on Ethnic and Religious Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding, mail checks or money orders to:

International Center for Ethno-Religious Mediation
11 W. Prospect Avenue, 3rd Floor
Mount Vernon
New York 10550
USA

Checks or money orders must be drawn on a bank located in the United States. Make the check or money order payable to International Center for Ethno-Religious Mediation. NOTE: Spell out International Center for Ethno-Religious Mediation; and do NOT use the initial: ICERM.

For online payment by credit or debit card, please click on the link below: http://www.icermediation.org/Mediation/Daf/Donate.html#icermdonations

For inquiries or more information about sponsorship, contact Basil Ugorji or Marcelle Mauvais at: icerm@icermediation.org.

ICERM is a 501 (c) (3) tax exempt Public Charity / Nonprofit Organization qualified to receive tax deductible bequests, devises, transfers or gifts under section 2055, 2106 or 2522 of the Code.

Contributions to ICERM are deductible under section 170 of the Code.

 

Journal of Living Together: Sponsorship Opportunity

Journal of Living Together

Fall 2014 Issue:

The Role of Religion and Ethnicity in Contemporary Conflict:  Related Emerging Tactics, Strategies, & Methodologies of Mediation and Resolution

Sponsorship Package

The International Center for Ethno-Religious Mediation is soliciting and accepting sponsorship for the Fall 2014 Issue of its journal, The Journal of Living Together.

The sponsorship rates for the Journal of Living Together are as follows:

 

What You Will Get To Promote Your Business What You Will Donate
Full Page Back Cover $1,000.00 minimum/Highest bid
Full-Page Inside Covers $600.00 minimum/Highest bid
Center Page $400.00 minimum/Highest bid
Full Page $300.00
Half Page $150.00
Quarter Page $75.00
Business Poster  Space $50.00
Business Card Space $25.00

Purpose of the Journal

It is our intention to use this publication as a way to share ideas, varied perspectives, tools and strategies for the mediation and mitigation of religious and ethnic conflicts within and across borders. We do not discriminate against any people, faith or creed. We do not promote positions, defend opinions or determine the ultimate viability of our authors’ findings or methods. Instead, we open the door to researchers, policymakers, those impacted by conflict, and those serving in the field to consider what they read in these pages and join in productive and respectful discourse. We welcome your insights and invite you to take an active role in sharing what you’ve learned with us & our readership. Together we can inspire, educate and encourage adaptive changes and lasting peace.

This is a great opportunity to gain exposure for you, your organization, institution, association, center, business, union, or society. Individuals or organizations can send congratulatory messages or have their upcoming events, publications, or call for papers announced in the Journal of Living Together.

The Journal of Living Together will be included in the most comprehensive and widely used databases of journals in the fields of social sciences and peace studies, and shall also be distributed by Ingram Content Group Inc., the world’s largest and most trusted distributor of physical and digital content, and other internationally acclaimed journal distributors. The published articles will be available in print and online versions to a global audience: libraries, governments, policy makers, media, universities and colleges, organizations, associations, institutions and millions of potential individual readers.

To sponsor the upcoming issue of the Journal of Living Together, mail checks or money orders to:

International Center for Ethno-Religious Mediation
11 W. Prospect Avenue, 3rd Floor
Mount Vernon
New York 10550
USA

Checks or money orders must be drawn on a bank located in the United States. Make the check or money order payable to International Center for Ethno-Religious Mediation. NOTE: Spell out International Center for Ethno-Religious Mediation; and do NOT use the initial: ICERM.

For online donation by credit or debit card, please click on this link: http://www.icermediation.org/Mediation/Daf/Donate.html#icermdonations.

Do not be left out of the Journal of Living Together’s grand archive of great treasure and opportunity.

For inquiries or more information about sponsorship, contact Basil Ugorji or Marcelle Mauvais at: icerm@icermediation.org.

ICERM is a 501 (c) (3) tax exempt Public Charity / Nonprofit Organization qualified to receive tax deductible bequests, devises, transfers or gifts under section 2055, 2106 or 2522 of the Code.
Contributions to ICERM are deductible under section 170 of the Code.
Call for Papers for Upcoming Issues

Special Issue

“New Militant Movements in Africa and the Middle East”

The Journal of Living Together is currently accepting papers for a special issue highlighting the rise of new militant movements and their impact on the societies of Africa and the Middle East.

In this special issue, we are particularly interested in articles and case studies that address any of the following questions:

  • What are the ideological roots of these movements?
  • How do these movements deviate from their religious roots?
  • What devastating impacts do these movements have on the corresponding society?
  • What new tools are available to governments and peace organizations to prevent the expansion of these groups and to stem terrorism?
  • What models or means used in the past have helped to curb the activities of similar groups?
  • Also to be considered are in-depth scholarly biographies of leaders of these

Submission Deadline: February 28, 2015.

Download the full Call for Papers in “PDF Format” or “Word Format”.

 

Spring 2015 Issue

“The Anatomy and Remedy of Trans-generational Conflict”

The International Center for Ethno-Religious Mediation, New York is seeking scholarly papers/articles for the Spring 2015 edition of its journal, Living Together.

The beliefs & attitudes resulting from the trauma inflicted by violent ethno-religious conflict are often passed down through generations. For this edition, we are particularly interested in articles that address any of the following questions: 

  • What are the social and psychological processes at work in trans-generational conflict?
  • What role does governance/policy play in the exacerbation or amelioration of this form of conflict?
  • How can this legacy of violence be stopped/interrupted long enough for effective intervention?
  • Are there programs or practices in place that have demonstrated some promising results?
  • What can we learn, and perhaps incorporate, from emerging conflict mediation and mitigation practices designed to address trans-generational conflict?

Submission Deadline: February 28, 2015

Download the full Call for Papers inPDF Format” or “Word Format”.

 

Understanding the Historical Roots of Boko Haram

Understanding the Historical Roots of Boko Haram

By Bekeh Utietiang

In its March 31, 2014 issue, Time magazine published an article entitled “Nigeria’s Reckless Neglect” by Alexis Okeowo. The premise of Okeowo’s article was that the Islamic military insurgency in North-East Nigeria was as a result of past Nigerian governments’ neglect of social and economic problems of the North leading to one of the highest illiteracy rates in the world. The writer also claimed that investments were done in the oil-rich South at the expense of the North. Such analysis is oversimplified and seen in binaries.

There is no doubt that the current Nigerian government has displayed some high degree of ineptitude when it comes to dealing with the problem of Boko Haram, but one should not be amiss with its complexity. The roots of this problem predate Nigerian independence and can only be understood in its long historical context. The problem is rooted in the scope and nature of British colonial rule in Nigeria, and one can trace a rather complex continuity between what is happening now and the structure that the British set up in the early 1900s.

Prior to the 1914 amalgamation of the Northern and Southern Protectorates of Nigeria into one territory, the British High Commissioner of the Northern Protectorate, Frederick Lugard championed a form of native administration which was known in British colonial history as “Indirect Rule.” In this part of the country, the rule was mainly carried out by Muslim emirs. After 1914, this rule continued and Lugard tried to extend it to the southern part of Nigeria. The danger associated with this rule in the North was that Lugard vociferously prevented Christian missionaries from extending Western education to the North. Sir Hugh Clifford, who succeeded Lugard in 1919 as Governor General of Nigeria, was critical of indirect rule in northern Nigeria as he believed it insulated the North. Clifford, like Lugard, maintained indirect rule for the simple reason that they did not want to wrestle the socio-cultural and religious structure upon which the colonial state rested. The fear was that the presence of missionaries would challenge the colonial structure, which seemed to be stable. For several decades, the education that was exposed to the north was Koranic/Islamic education. While Western education flourished in the South; the North was left behind.

On independence of Nigeria, power was left by the British in the hands of the north with Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa, as prime minister, and Chief Nnamdi Azikiwe as the ceremonial president. The vitality of the new independent state was soon to be stifled by the inability of the Nigerian leaders to form a national consensus toward ripping the benefits of self-rule that they had so longed for and promised the people. Sadly, the battle over who controls the “national cake” (the economic resources of Nigeria) wrapped in ethnically based regional parties would soon lead to political strives and ethnic tensions. These resulted in coups and counter-coups that were sectarian in nature. These led to the Nigerian civil war, which in its three years of existence, created mass casualties and ruptured the vestiges of whatever had existed in the name of nationhood.

Flushed with cash from the oil boom of the 1970s, the country that emerged from the war tried to rebuild all that was destroyed during the war. Perhaps, what could not be changed was the mutual suspicion between the ethnic and regional bases that comprised of the Nigerian polity.

To further complicate things, when the southern part of the country, at this time composed of the western and eastern regional governments, introduced very successful programs of universal primary education in 1955 and 1957 respectively, the northern part of the country stayed out of this project because they associated for the most part Western education with Christian education because most of the schools in southern Nigeria were housed in mission locations, headed by mission teachers, and taught Christian religion. The North was content with Islamic education, which if it were only visualized from a distance seemed comparable with the education that was offered by Christian schools in the south. However, Western education was not simply the study of the Bible and catechism, but it imbued its subjects with some core philosophies and values that were necessary for success in a global world; mostly ruled by a Western educational value system. Other subjects beyond Christianity such as arithmetic, history and civics were taught in these schools. This was not the case in the Koranic schools in the North, where the children were taught mainly the memorization of the Koran and the Islamic tenets.

By 1976 when a Christian president from the South, Olusegun Obasanjo introduced nationally, the Universal Primary Education project and pushed it strongly across the country, northern Nigeria was starting at a place of disadvantage; one caused by the early British colonial leaders and the late colonial northern rulers. While northern leaders now saw the advantage of this new system, many remained reluctant to embrace it and still favored the koranic schools. Many young people continued to be steeped in the ideology that Western style education was corrupt and out to undermine Islam. This notion was propagated by some imams and preachers who wanted to maintain their relevancy. Further compounding the problem in the region was the nomadic nature of the Fulani cattle rearers who were a significant bloc of northern Nigeria. They continued to shun Western education in such massive proportions that the military administration of Ibrahim Babangida, a northern Muslim, introduced nomadic education in 1989. This program has remained a colossal failure and it is important to mention that some of the riots and massacres that have happened in some of the villages in northern Nigeria have been attributed to these nomads. The Nigerian government is also reporting that Boko Haram groups are embedding themselves with these Fulani herders.

How did Boko Haram become a part of this history? Boko Haram simply means that Western education is forbidden. Why? It is because members of this group believe that it is corrupt, morally bankrupt and evil. Their goal is to institute an Islamic sharia state. It is important to note that its ideology is gradually developing. Of recent, the terror group did not even have a leader who spoke for the movement and even now, it is in question whether the group has one unified movement with a single plan, or separate groups are working disparately for the same broad mission.

This kind of terrorist movement that has attacked Western values is not new to Nigeria. It has always been brewing underground and even raised it’s ugly head in the 1970s. An Islamic militant movement emerged in 1972 called Maitatsine. It was actually not an entirely new movement as its founder, Mohammed Marwa had originally been exiled by the British from Nigeria during colonial rule, because of his extremist views and preaching. Marwa was born in the northeast region of British Nigeria and Cameroon’s (now a part of the Cameroon’s). He returned from exile in 1972 and gradually began to build his followership. By the early 1980s when the group emerged publicly and started carrying out attacks, the members believed that both the traditional Muslim rulers and the politicians had betrayed Islam and deserved death. The members rejected everything Western such as radios, cars and Western education. The movement, like Boko Haram, concentrated its attacks in northern Nigeria. Over 5,000 people were killed by the sect between 1980 and 1985 before the Nigerian military government crushed them and many members flew across the borders to Cameroon. Marwa himself was killed in 1980. Musa Makaniki, his successor was arrested by the Nigerian government in 2004 after a visit to Nigeria from Cameroon. Little is reported of his activities in the Cameroon’s during the 19 years he spent there. Many questions remain unsatisfactorily answered. Had he established links with al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb? Was he radicalizing many young Muslims for an eventual battle with Nigeria? The styles of attacks of the Boko Haram group do suggest similarities with the Maitatsine group, which was notorious for going into peoples homes at night and slitting their throats; something Boko Haram consistently does. The group also attacked police and army constellations, as well as churches and schools; another trademark of Boko Haram attacks. The origins of the attacks and the places used as safe nets also suggest strong parallels with both groups. The only discernible difference right now, and one we are not completely certain of, is that Boko Haram is comprised mostly of educated Muslim youths while we know as a matter of fact that the Maitatsine sect was made up mainly of uneducated laborers. This difference still needs to be carefully explored.

To curb the deadly activities of Boko Haram in Nigeria, careful attention must be paid to its regional connections beyond Nigeria. The activities from the Cameroonian side of the border need to be carefully analyzed, since this has not received much attention. In order for the problem to be contained, both the Nigerian and Cameroonian governments must cordon off their border areas, temporarily relocate law-abiding citizens and declare the whole area a conflict zone. Without which, many innocent people would continue to be slaughtered each day, as it has been happening in the last few years.

Bekeh Utietiang is a native of Nigeria and a resident of the United States. He did his Masters degree in Religion and Culture at The Catholic University of America, Washington DC and Ph.D at West Virginia University, Morgantown.

Bekeh Utietiang is a native of Nigeria and a resident of the United States. He did his Masters degree in Religion and Culture at The Catholic University of America, Washington DC and Ph.D at West Virginia University, Morgantown.

About the Author:

Bekeh Utietiang is a native of Nigeria and a resident of the United States. He did his Masters degree in Religion and Culture at The Catholic University of America, Washington DC and Ph.D at West Virginia University, Morgantown. His areas of research are development history and political and religious culture of West African Societies. A special area of focus is new political and religious movements and how these shape the respective societies. Bekeh is a regular blogger on the Huffington Post. He also maintains a personal website, http://www.bekeh.com

New York City Living Together Movement

First Living Together Movement Meeting in New York City

A new civic movement made up of peace-driven individuals who recognize the same humanity in all peoples, and are passionate about bridging the gap between different races, ethnicities, religions, political views, genders, generations and nationalities, in order to increase respect, tolerance, acceptance, understanding and harmony in the world.

A new civic movement made up of peace-driven individuals who recognize the same humanity in all peoples, and are passionate about bridging the gap between different races, ethnicities, religions, political views, genders, generations and nationalities, in order to increase respect, tolerance, acceptance, understanding and harmony in the world.

You are cordially invited to attend the first Living Together Movement meeting in New York City.

When: Friday, May 30, 2014 at 5:30 pm in Eastern Time. 

Where: John H. Holmes Community House, Third Floor.

28 East 35th Street, New York, NY 10016.

Registration: Registration is free and open to the public, but you must RSVP to attend the meeting.  To RSVP, send your name and contact information to:

livingtogethermovement(at)icermediation.org.

You can also join our new meetup group and RSVP on that page.

The Living Together Movement is like “a home outside a home”. Come and listen, talk, learn, share and celebrate in a relaxed, friendly, and welcoming ambience. 

Bring your unique stories, cultural backgrounds, life experiences, words of wisdom, feelings, worries, disappointments, success stories, etc. Everyone will be given an equal opportunity to talk about / share with the group anything of particular interest to him or her.

We practice empathic listening, and do not judge or criticize anyone. Our goal is to truly understand the other before seeking to be understood; and to focus on what the other person is saying rather than what we are going to say next.

To celebrate our diversity in a symbolic manner, please bring your favorite/cultural/ethnic songs (if you have one), light food, and drinks to the meeting; and together we shall renew our commitment to live together in mutual respect and dignity.

Meeting Reflection:

The 21st century continues to experience waves of ethnic and religious violence making it one of the most devastating threats to peace, political stabilization, economic growth and security in our world. These conflicts have killed and maimed tens of thousands and displaced hundreds of thousands, planting the seed for even greater fear, hatred, intolerance, violence and revenge in the future.

We recognize this to be a crucial moment in history, a time to step up and ensure that our children and grandchildren do not have to suffer through the horrors of war or genocide in all of their guises.

As bridge builders, humanists, and peace advocates with diverse beliefs, cultures, customs, backgrounds, etc., it falls to all of us to open the doors to dialogue, to come to truly know one another, and to accept that in so doing, we can take the first tentative steps toward a world that can work for everyone.

And so we begin by working from where we are by revealing the assets available to us. The religious and ethnic differences long blamed for hatred and intolerance are taken out into the light where the advantages that they offer, the connections between us that they make apparent and the opportunities for healthy relations they support are affirmed. Our strength and promise are based on this foundation.

About Living Together Movement:

Living Together Movement, a project of the International Center for Ethno-Religious Mediation, is a new civic movement made up of peace-driven individuals who recognize the same humanity in all peoples, and are passionate about bridging the gap between different races, ethnicities, religions, political views, genders, generations and nationalities, in order to increase respect, tolerance, acceptance, understanding and harmony in the world.

We come together every month to listen to, talk with, learn from, understand and share with one another. Each member enriches the group with a unique story and cultural background. Everyone is given an equal opportunity to talk about his or her cultural background and feelings, or any topics of interest, including but not limited to security issues, politics, policies, war, conflict, conflict resolution, human dignity, forgiveness, foreign relations, world peace, economy, education, employment, family, health, immigration, science and technology.

We practice empathic listening, and do not judge or criticize anyone. Our goal is to truly understand the other before seeking to be understood; and to focus on what the other person is saying rather than what we are going to say next.

We celebrate our diversity in a symbolic manner with the traditional arts, songs, food and drinks that our members bring to the living together meeting.

GRANT & PROPOSAL WRITING INTERN for Fundraising & Development

Internship Announcement

GRANT & PROPOSAL WRITING INTERN for Fundraising & Development

The International Center for Ethno-Religious Mediation in NYC, a vibrant and rapidly growing international NGO, is seeking an accomplished, energetic Grant & Proposal Writing Intern with Fundraising & Development experience. We are especially interested in applicants whose studies are/were related to international relations, peace studies, and international conflict mitigation and mediation.
Internships are 15-20 per week for a minimum of three months. The majority of the work can be performed off-site by telecommuting.

The Candidate will possess:

  • Fundraising & grant writing experience in the not-for-profit sector
  • Experience responding to RFPs – requests for proposals
    Maturity, flexibility, initiative, perseverance
  • Creative and positive energy, dedication to making a difference
  • A good sense of humor
  • A resourceful and proactive nature
  • A native-level proficiency in English (speaking and writing)
  • The ability to work independently in a deadline-driven environment
  • Experience producing online content
  • A passion for Grant & Proposal Writing and its potential to serve Fundraising & Development efforts to advance peace-building
  • The ability to thrive as part of a team, as well as the ability to work and think independently
  • Previous nonprofit experience preferred, but not required

Responsibilities:

  • Develop Fundraising & Development strategy in alignment with ICERM Mission
  • Research Grants & Proposals relevant to the ICERM Mission; compile accurate profiles of prospective funders.
  • Discover and respond to relevant RFPs & write grant proposals to targeted donor prospects to fund ICERM’s Mission and projects, and gifts in the form of contributions-in-kind; such as: donations of meeting space for conferences & symposia, office space, furniture, equipment, office supplies, etc.
  • Develop donor prospects & maintain donor relations, including writing follow-ups and thank you letters; maintaining records of ICERM donors and contact’s communications.
  • Expand and improve the philanthropic organizations, foundations, individual donors, and corporate donor prospect base.
  • Develop and maintain Fundraising & Development database listing donor contacts and tracking Grants & Proposals keeping it accurate and up-to-date.
  • Develop & pitch fundraising event ideas.
  • Research opportunities for ICERM to participate/speak at conferences or events related to conflict mediation.
  • Research potential guest speakers, interviewees, honorees from among our donors who exemplify ICERM mission for mention on our web site, inclusion in our Journal, or to be guests on our radio show, etc. Assist with drafting save-the-dates and invitations, keeping track of guest lists
  • Contribute to ICERM blog content weekly to be posted on the ICERM website and shared through relevant social networks; contribute content to ICERM e-newsletters
  • Work alongside marketing, social media, and events planning staff & interns to support the development strategy.
  • Reply to online queries and general correspondence related to Fundraising, Grants & Proposals
  • Help to develop creative ideas & online content for membership drives, up-coming events, development campaigns and special projects.
  • Help fulfill requests for information, undertake special projects and assignments as needed

Some of our Special Projects include:
The Journal of Living Together
The Living Together Movement
The ICERM radio show including book reviews, music, expert panels, and related lectures, etc.
Membership and fundraising campaigns, including radio sponsorship
Annual International Conference on Ethnic And Religious Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding

Certificate Training Programs

Conflict Monitoring Networks

 

Internship Benefits:
An ICERM Certificate of Participation and Appreciation for your professional portfolio
Your inclusion on our website as an outstanding intern
A written professional reference
An invitation to be involved with future ICERM events

ICERM interns are given the chance to grow and develop professionally through their experience and exposure to real international issues on the front lines and an international team of experts who continue to serve all over the globe. Dedicated interns will hone their professional research, reporting, and writing techniques while developing the international contacts that will ensure their professional futures.

Ideal candidates will have a demonstrated interest in international issues, peace building, and the needs of vulnerable or marginalized populations & be able to provide excellent references.
To apply:

Submit your resume along with a cover letter expressing why you see yourself as a top candidate for this internship, including a list of proposals and grants that you have written and other examples of your successes in Fundraising & Development in the not-for-profit sector to: careers@icermediation.org.

Include the words “Fundraising & Development Internship” in the subject line.

Front list of candidates will be contacted.
 

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